Our Farm “Bucket List”

This is a list of all the components and goals we would like to accomplish, perpetuate, and grow here at Frühlingskabine Micro-Farm along our path to self-reliance. Some things on our list will be simple tasks or crops to grow and others are long-term goals. Learn along with us as we complete (and add) things to our “bucket list”.

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Food Production


Grow food and medicine from organic, heirloom seed
✓Save seeds from harvests
Grow:
……. Fruit orchard: apples, cherries, figs, lemons, olives, oranges, pears, persimmons, plums, pomegranates
……. Nut trees: almonds
……. Berries: blackberries, blueberries, strawberries
……. Grains: Barley, wheat, rye
…….✓Sprouted fodder: feed livestock using mostly a fodder diet
Bees
……. Tend up to 8 beehives: honey, beeswax
……. Build our own beehives
Chickens and Turkeys
……. Keep a dozen laying hens: eggs, compost manure

……. Keep breeds that hatch and raise their own young: meat, compost manure
Rabbits
……. Keep 8-10 adult angora rabbits: angora wool, compost manure
…….✓Raise multiple litters each season: meat, fur pelts
Goats
……. Keep 2+ dairy goat does: milk, cheese, butter, compost manure
……. Grow out bucklings for: meat

General Farmyness


Donkey
……. Use a jenny donkey to guard goats
……. Teach a donkey to drive a cart
Garden Tools
…….✓Use hand powered tools whenever possible
…….✓Compost manure from all livestock on the farm
……. Do not bring in outside manures and composts

Food Choices


Eat only pastured/organic meats from local farmers
Supplement what we grow with seasonal, organic food from local farmers
✓Buy in bulk through a local food co-op

Household


Compost all food waste
Cook from scratch 5+ days a week using nourishing and traditional foods
…….✓Bake bread from scratch
…….✓Brew homemade drinks: ginger bugs/ales, water kefir, kombucha
Use cast iron or stainless steel cookware: no non-stick
✓Remove dishwasher and microwave
Use cloth bags for shopping and lunch bags
✓Make, mend, re-use, or make do
Conserve water
……. Save rainwater
……. Build a greywater system for heavy drinking plants
……. Garden using water efficient methods: plant selection, hügelkultur
……. Install low-flow toilets and shower fixtures
……. Use earth-friendly cleaners that are okay for greywater system
Make all medicines for the household
Use solar and wind power
……. Solar/electric goat fence
……. Solar well pump
……. Utilize both solar and windmill systems for household power
✓Dry clothing outside on the clothesline or inside by the woodstove
✓Sew, crochet, knit
✓Use cloth napkins, cloth rags, and cloth diapers
Make our own toothpaste, shampoo, soap, lotion, facial cleansers, laundry detergent
✓Heat with woodstove, rugs, blankets in winter
✓Use rechargeable batteries, create rechargeable station
✓No cable, limited tv

Home Economy


Lead workshops and “work days” at the farm
✓Barter and trade whenever possible
✓Operate a Farmstand or Farmer’s Market booth
Produce farm goods
……. Grass-fed and pastured meats
…….✓Raw angora wool and yarn
…….✓Pastured eggs
…….✓French Angora rabbit kits for sale
……. Farm-mutt chicks for sale

14 thoughts on “Our Farm “Bucket List”

  1. Good luck with those sustainable living goals and even if you don’t accomplish all of them, know that you’ll be reducing your carbon footprint, something that all of us should be doing.

  2. Your plan looks similar to mine except I have meat rabbits also. I know Angoras are edible, but I continue to look at their profitability stand point rather than food.
    You may want to raise turkeys and ducks. Both are loud early warning systems. Maybe a pig our two for pork if your family likes it…mine can’t eat it.
    Look into a aquaponics system you can build for fish and fresh greens all your around. I have a small system right now that provides me with enough fresh trout and tilapia that I can eat fresh fish twice a week. The trout eat the small fry from the tilapia and duck weed.

    • Can you send me some info or pictures of your setup? For some reason I have a really hard time finding ideas I like on aquaponics systems.

      I use any “extra” and sub-standard rabbits for meat. With angoras, I don’t sell anywhere close to all of the rabbits from my litters so I use the rest for meat. I think my dual-purpose French Angoras have a good meat to bone ratio. For a 16-week old rabbit, I get 5.5 lbs. live weight (2.5 lbs. dressed) and a beautiful, sturdy pelt for tanning.

      I have turkeys on my list along with more chickens. But I may have to pass on pigs because I can’t eat pork. I think it is too fatty for myself to digest.

  3. Love it! Your list looks alot like mine. Scratch the solar electric goat fence though – I already tried that one. A solar charger pulses and those darn goats are too clever for that! They time their escape to coincide with the pulse lapse. Stinkers!

  4. Your list looks somewhat like mine! I am presently thinking I really want a couple of dairy goats. Hubby has been putting me off for a while because he thinks this idea will pass (ask me why he thinks this). However, I am pretty set on it. I noticed that you listed butter beside the goats and I wanted to share a sad thing I read the other day. Goats milk is naturally homogenized (cream won’t rise) so it’s not good for butter. Bummer! However, I KNOW I am not ready for a cow. I need to start small. I am looking for nigerian dwarfs (dwarves?) because they are smaller and I think their feed will be more manageable.

    On the other hand, I was able to get some raw milk from a friend and just got through making fresh butter and mozzarella. Maybe a cow wouldn’t be completely out of the question…. 😉

    Thanks for sharing your journey with us! I enjoy reading!

    • Oh, I know about the natural homogenization thing. But it will not deter me! I WILL make butter with goats milk!!!

      Have you seen the cream separators that “they” sell especially for goats milk? I have even seen vintage hand crank versions, so that is my master plan… go back in time, steal away a hand crank cream separator from some unsuspecting lady (’cause let’s face it, the ladies were the homemakers and hand crankers), and then hop back into my time machine/Tardis/DeLorean and come home to make butter.

      Butter. Done.

  5. What a great list, love it! I have many of the same desires/goals, especially for self sufficiency, and will definitely be following your blog. 🙂

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