Frühlingskabine Q&A :: July 2013

Check out the questions I received for July’s Q&A session as well as a brief update on the quail. To submit your own questions, no matter how large or small, email me at: fmicrofarm@gmail.com and I will include your questions or ideas in next month’s videos!

July 2013 Q&A :: Part 1 of 3

July 2013 Q&A :: Part 2 of 3

July 2013 Q&A :: Part 3 of 3

See the transcript for these videos here.

6 thoughts on “Frühlingskabine Q&A :: July 2013

  1. Oh no. We ran out of internet data (downside of living remotely where you need satellite internet.) I can’t see the streams. Do you have transcripts?

  2. Gluten free sprouting grains

    Milo
    Oats ** you can get gluten free oats. Oats are not a gluten grain however they are usually grown directly after a wheat crop or surounded by wheat crops and bcome contaminated that way.
    buckwheat
    Amaranth
    Quiona
    Sorhgum
    Millet

    Also all of my research suggests that gluten is found in the seed not the grass. A cealiac can consume wheat grass but not the seed

  3. Sorry the quails didn’t work out for you.
    At least is was an interesting learning experience.
    On most of the webpages I read about quail cannibalism,
    they said that once a quail starts cannibalising, it is very hard to break the habit.
    So even when you correct all the possible causes, such as diet, they will continue to practise it.
    But anyway, I think just barley and mealworms could never be an adequate diet, even apart from the low protein issue.
    I think all animals need a wide range of food items to supply all the essential nutrients.

    • So true. I learned quite a bit from the quail. Considering how high maintenence they are, I don’t think I would have enjoyed raising them full cycle. They were just to sensitive to be considered a worthy homestead “livestock”.

      The sprouted barley fodder didn’t work out for the quail, but my chickens are doing well on it (with free range time and calcium supplement) and my rabbits have absolutely flourished on it. The rabbits now have larger litters, nurse much better and without problem, and I have less runts and no casualties. So I think being that rabbits are herbivores, they are much better suited to a diet of purely fodder, seeds, and hay.

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